How To Buy High-End Baby Clothing Without Breaking the Bank

When our son was born 18 months ago, my preference for high-end clothing brands shifted from buying items for myself to purchasing clothes and accessories for him. Specifically, I developed an affinity for just about anything European or vintage. Peter Pan collars. Knee socks. Oxford shoes. Hand-knit gnome hats. Swoon!

Lucky me, I fell into the small percentage of American women who actually receive maternity leave, and not just any maternity leave—PAID maternity leave. What happens when you have a sleep-deprived new mother up at all hours of the night breastfeeding with a disposable income? I’ll tell you. Packages start arriving day after day, and you have zero recollection of having ordered the items.

Did I click purchase in the middle of the night again? And these weren’t small purchases. $100 for a European sweater set that he’ll wear one time? Sure. $55 for a knit hat from the UK? Why not? The charges kept adding up, but with my cushy job at a major tech company and plans to return to work in a few months, I didn’t bat an eye.

That’s all changed now that I’m a Stay At Home Mom relying on my husband’s salary for our soon-to-be family of SEVEN. Yes, I said seven. That’s five, count them, FIVE kids. Not to mention the two dogs that are basically the size of horses.

Because my fancy tastes haven’t changed, I’ve had to find creative ways to fulfill my desire to dress my child in completely impractical European outfits solely for the photo op. In case you too have lavish taste for your child, or simply want to buy things that are higher quality and last longer than your average kids’ clothing, here are some tips to do so without breaking the bank:

  • Shop an app called Kidizen, where moms sell all sorts of brands at reasonable prices. I’ve found several pieces for Baby A from my favorite European brands. I’ve also found several NWT (that stands for New With Tags for all of you new used clothing shoppers.) shoes from See Kai Run. For something they can grow out of so quickly, this makes way more sense to me than paying full price. Bonus, you can re-sell the items on Kidizen when you’re finished!
  • Check out Instagram for mamas with similar styles to yours who are reselling their kids’ clothing. I have a friend who regularly finds deals this way.
  • Ebay is a great option for shoes.
  • Don’t forget about Etsy–I recently found a great deal on a vintage button down for Baby A and a Christening outfit!
  • Look for Buy, Sell, Trade groups on Facebook for your favorite brands. I found a national and local one for Hanna Andersson (HA) and Mini Boden, two of my personal faves. If that’s your jam too, do a search and request to join. There is a ton of great stuff on there!
  • Keep an eye out for garage sales, especially in neighborhoods where parents are more likely to shop the high-end brands you prefer. I scored big last weekend when I found a MASSIVE Hanna Andersson garage sale. I dropped a few hundred dollars for what was easily more than $1,000 worth of kids clothing—all in excellent condition.
  • Find a local consignment shop. If you’re a Seattle area mom like myself, I prefer this one on the Eastside. It can be hit or miss, and finding a quality brand like HA is rare, but it can happen! As proof, I scored an amazing LIKE NEW HA snowsuit for my son.
  • Look for local consignment sales like Just Between Friends. The Issaquah one is coming up THIS weekend!
  • If you’re not into buying used clothing, wait to make purchases when the sales are BIG or you have coupons. Yes, it can be annoying to receive regular emails from stores, but you don’t want to miss a sale of 30-40 percent off like HA had last week. If you miss those, you can always buy clothes off season, and there are always the Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales, which is when I purchase our Christmas jammies each year.

Happy shopping, mamas!

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Confessions of a Pregnant Woman

After the same ad kept reappearing on my Facebook feed almost daily, I decided to click the “hide” option. It wasn’t just that it continued to pop up on my feed that irritated me—I also couldn’t stand what it said.

“Don’t get me wrong, I love being pregnant,” the sponsored ad said, “but it isn’t always a walk in the park.”

What was it about that line that got under my skin so much? Well, what if you don’t “love being pregnant?” I thought to myself. Why do you need to caveat that you love being pregnant before talking about uncomfortable changes and aches to your body? What is it that makes us as women feel like we have to say we love being pregnant, whether we do or not? Like we’re some monster if we scream from the rooftop,

I HATE BEING PREGNANT!

Clearly, that must mean that you’re a horrible person who doesn’t deserve to be pregnant in the first place, let alone experience the miracle of life at the end of the 40 long weeks.

Maybe the woman in the post truly loves being pregnant. I know those mythical creatures exist. I’m, however, not one of them.

While I had next to zero complaints or problems during my first pregnancy—until of course the very end when no one in their right mind can be comfortable that size—I still hated it. I hated the feeling of being out of control of my body as it changed in ways I could never imagine. I hated feeling like I was sharing my body with someone, but most of the time it felt more like something.

“When he starts to kick, it will feel real to you, and you’ll love it,” friends told me.

I must admit, when it happened I was legitimately freaked out. Was this a baby inside me or an alien? Only time would tell.

With this pregnancy, I thought surely I would feel differently. Now that I’ve confirmed that it was not in fact an alien and experienced the joy of my son, I thought for sure I wouldn’t feel like I had a foreign visitor inside of me this time.

Wrong.

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Stephanie Rubyor managed to make me forget about the stretch marks and discomfort long enough to feel beautiful, and dare I say, glowing in my maternity session.

I still feel weird about it. And it’s not just that. This pregnancy hasn’t been an easy go around. Perhaps it’s the old wives tale of girl vs boy, but my first trimester was wrought with morning sickness and exhaustion not to mention enough tears to fill the Atlantic Ocean. I’m also not one of those women who feels the most beautiful she’s ever felt when she’s pregnant. You’ve heard of those people, right? You know, the ones who are glowing.

I’m here to tell you that passing gas without so much as a two second warning or peeing a little when you sneeze are about the last things that make you feel sexy.

Oh, and remember that blog post I wrote bidding farewell to my voluptuous breasts when I stopped nursing? Well, they’re back. In full force. And don’t even get me started on what my nipples look like.

So why am I putting myself through this again, you ask? You see, the thing is, it really is all worth it in the end. The moment you see your baby for the first time tops my list as the most incredible moment in my life. Bringing Baby A into this world is my proudest accomplishment, and I can’t believe I’m lucky enough to do it again in just a few months when we meet our baby girl for the first time. (Someone remind me of this post when I’m several hours into labor hating life and wanting to give up, okay?)

I love the end result, but I’ll be damned if I tell you that I love being pregnant.

Advocating for your child when the school district won’t

“There is no school equal to a decent home and no teacher equal to a virtuous parent.”
-Ghandi

We recently learned that sometimes the very entity you hope is looking out for your child’s academic success can fail you in a big way. Last May, we received a letter in the mail telling us that our youngest daughter, L, was placed in the Common Core Math Pathway. These pathways, which are designated at the end of fifth grade, have been very controversial in our school district because they determine children’s math classes throughout high school.

The Common Core Pathway, or slowest path as it happens to be, does not give the students Pre-Calculus early enough to adequately prepare them for the SAT. We had heard of parents appealing their children’s placement, but my husband and I didn’t give it much thought because we assumed our daughter would place in the Accelerated or Exceptional Pathways. After all, she was just as good at math as her older brother, who placed in the Accelerated Pathway just one year prior, and she had a natural proclivity for STEM—math in particular. As such, you can imagine how shocked we were when we learned that she didn’t.

When we looked closely at her scores, we saw she had an above average score for the ITBS, but she received a zero for the CogAT. We learned that if a student did not score above a certain score on the CogAT, the student was given zero “domain points.” We assumed this must have been the case. Upon further inspection, we learned that L didn’t have a CogAT score at all! You see, she moved in with us from her bio-mom’s house in a different school district in January, and for whatever reason, her old school did not give her the CogAT.

As a result, we appealed the decision, noting it was not a proper placement for her because she did not have an opportunity to take the CogAT to prove her abilities. We told them that as her parents, we strongly believed the next pathway up, the Accelerated Pathway, would be more appropriate for her. A month later, we received a letter in the mail that our request was denied. L would remain in the Common Core Pathway.

That’s when I kicked it into high gear. I contacted the name and number at the bottom of the letter, who I learned was an analyst who served as a “gatekeeper” for the administration on this topic. She was armed with a calm voice and lots of pre-packaged compelling data points—she was the perfect person to walk overzealous parents insisting their child was gifted, off the ledge.

I explained L’s situation and how she didn’t belong in Common Core. Her father and I simply wanted to set her up for academic success, and we didn’t feel she would be appropriately challenged in the slowest pathway, I told her. I asked if L could have an opportunity to take the CogAT and prove she deserved to be in the Accelerated Pathway.

That’s when I was told that the CogAT was not a math test. The district simply used it for that purpose since it was already a State-required test, and they didn’t want to require the students to take another, more appropriate, one. 

It was a “test to identify students who were truly gifted.”

When I asked that L have an opportunity to take the CogAT, she told me only 50 out of 700 students in the entire district scored as high as she would need to score to be put in the Accelerated Pathway, and it was unlikely our daughter would score that high. She recommended L continue in Common Core, and if we still felt it wasn’t a good fit for her, we could appeal again in the spring of L’s sixth grade year. Our chances of approval were much higher then, she told me. If I wasn’t satisfied with this explanation and approach, I was welcome to take my concerns up the chain to district administrators.

That’s exactly what I did.

It took three emails, a phone call, and an escalation email to the Assistant Superintendent before I received a response from the administrator in charge of the Math Pathway Program. I then waited weeks for an in-person meeting, only to be called by her assistant the day before the scheduled meeting to tell me she needed to reschedule for the following month. I told her that was unacceptable. I planned childcare for my baby, and I had already waited weeks for this. She said she had time on her calendar that afternoon, if I could make it work, almost certainly a throw away offer because she knew I likely didn’t have childcare. I said I’d be there. I texted a friend who lived down the street to watch our baby, and I gathered my data and armed myself to fight for our daughter.

The administrator also came armed to the teeth with data. I learned before the meeting that she had a reputation for being stubborn and not changing her mind even in the face of surmounting evidence. As someone who used to brief U.S. policymakers in Washington D.C., some of whom were very difficult customers, I wasn’t intimidated. I diplomatically went back and forth with her for an hour, and I think she found I was a formidable opponent. It was clear she wasn’t expecting a well-educated, polished speaker who wasn’t going to back down when it came to her child’s education.

The administrator repeatedly told me that L “needed the gift of time.” She told me she didn’t come to my work and presume to be an expert, and similarly, I shouldn’t tell the experts who made L’s pathway decision how to do their job. I told her the “experts” who sat around the table did not know our daughter like we do. L had only been in the district for two months when this decision was made, and she was missing a test score that was instrumental in the placement decision. Why didn’t one of those experts speak up and say that L needed to be tested in order to make a proper decision? Why was she not given the same opportunity that every other student was given? There was no data that indicated L would struggle in a higher placement, so why not give her a chance?

After my insistence, the administrator agreed to let L take the CogAT. I worked through the analyst with whom I spoke initially to schedule a time for L to take the test. My husband and I crossed our fingers that L would do well enough on the test to be placed where we knew she deserved to be, but we were anxious knowing that the test wasn’t meant to measure math abilities at all.

L came home from taking the test feeling nervous, and we all anxiously awaited her test results. We received a call the following day, telling us L scored a 125, well above a 116, the score necessary to place her in the Accelerated Pathway.

She blew it out of the water!

Not only were we ecstatic, we were vindicated.

We know that if it weren’t for our advocacy and intervention, L would not have had the opportunity to prove her abilities and thus be put in the best pathway for her. It begs the question, how many other children are placed in an inappropriate pathway yet their parents have trusted that the district knows best? Or simply aren’t a stay at home parent like myself who has the time to ride the district until their child gets what he or she deserves?

The school district’s website says that they are “committed to preparing all students to meet their highest potential.” This, unfortunately, wasn’t our experience.

Telling us that the test was for children who were “truly gifted” and that L likely would not score as high as she needed to score was unacceptable. Do not tell me my child is not gifted. Do not tell me my child can’t do something. Give her a chance. She will show you what she can do.

We strongly believe we should never count a child out without giving her a chance to prove her abilities.

I sent this feedback to the Superintendent and Assistant Superintendent. If they don’t know when and how they’ve failed, they can’t improve.

I also sent this feedback to the administrator who sat across the table from me earlier this summer and insisted my daughter was not ready. That she couldn’t do it. I thanked her for helping us drive home an important life lesson to our daughter—do not let anyone ever tell you that you can’t do something.